Archive | Stanley, Susie RSS feed for this section

The Promise Fulfilled: Women’s Ministries in the Wesleyan/Holiness Movement

Introduction   While evangelist Lena Shoffner was preaching in Oklahoma City in 1904, a man rose and proceeded to the platform. Disrupting the meeting, he shouted: “I rebuke thee in the name of the Lord.” The individual insisted Shoffner leave the pulpit. In response, she stopped her sermon long enough to place her hand on […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Tell me the Old, Old Story: An Analysis of Autobiographies by Holiness Women

Autobiographies “draw us as surely as we are drawn to the pages of People magazine in the dentist’s waiting room.”1 The person making this statement, however, apparently had not read some holiness autobiographies! Fortunately, another scholar observes: “There is less concern now with prescriptive definitions of a ‘true’ or ‘good’ autobiography.”2 Many holiness autobiographies would […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Social Holiness in New York City: Wesleyan/Holiness Women Share God’s love

When historians of American religion turn their attention to Christian outreach in our cities at the turn of the century, they generally mention social gospelers such as Walter Rauschenbusch or Washington Gladden, who emerged from mainline Protestantism. Often overlooked are the efforts of women in the Wesleyan/Holiness Movement who also ministered among the millions of […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →

Empowered Foremothers: Wesleyan/Holiness Women Speak to Today’s Christian Feminists

Women in the Wesleyan/Holiness Movement of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries possessed the power of the Holy Spirit which enabled them to minister. Amanda Smith and Hulda Rees are just two examples. Methodist Bishop James M. Thoburn attributed Amanda Smith’s evangelistic success to “that invisible something which we are accustomed to call power, and […]

Leave a comment Continue Reading →